New Music – YODDY Piper

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Rowdy in the booth and as relatable as the pavement everyone stomps around on, the concrete jungle that Your Old Droog represents through their lyricism and wittiness continues to inspire and form a relationship with New York’s finest.

The newest EP comes in the form of YOD Wave, less than two months before the collaborative record between Droog and Tha God Fahim, Tha Wolf On Wall St 2: The American Dream dropped.

Breaking fewer ankles here and being more of a straightforward rhyme fest on YOD Wave, the emotion here feels as if Droog was gearing up for a solid release schedule of back-to-back hits all through 2022.

The low-tuned strums on the high-pitched strings take the eastern European influence from Droog’s backing and push them to the forefront once again. Instead of being a full-fledge record, YOD Wave infiltrates and dissipates within less than 20 minutes.

While a shortened ride, the audience plays a huge role in the surrounding nature of Your Old Droog. Pieces like “Scooby Snacks” are whimsical and resemble the beauty of operatic performance as boom-bap percussion snaps alongside Your Old Droog as a lyricist. His gravel vocals are infectious and each punchline resembles a standup comedian who is precise with timing.

Some of the favorite lines come from the second verse that has Droog saying, “And don’t forget, success and failure is intertwined. On to the next round, I ain’t never waiting. Got my business off the ground, now it’s levitating. Played it  sweet like orchestras, made it from out of here, and you know how stuck  up  New Yorkers is.”

While one of the singles of YOD Wave, “Purple Rain Freestyle” alludes to Chappelle Show with moments of iconic memories flooding into the frame. Pancakes, purple, and Prince all appear in the chorus where over a  charismatic instrumental, Droog is easily identifiable and relatable in delivery.

The chorus illustrates, “If you ain’t got the same broads, same cars, and same houses; game – blouses. They really  tried to annihilate us, (So what you do?) Ate ‘em up like some purple Now And Later’s.”

By this point, YOD Wave is already more than halfway over but that moment of fulfillment comes in one of the more glorious uses of instrumentation. “Body Right, Mind Right” is going to be the final look at Droog before they disappear back into the crowded streets of Manhattan. 1000’s of people all around, a face on the stage becomes a face in the crowd with a somber use of piano and snapping percussion.

The color seems to fade to greys instead of vibrancy, the manhole covers which spew smoke, and the tenements with bars on the windows become the home for Your Old Droog. Strangely, this somber moment is a recollection of YOD Wave’s godly prowess and for one of the reasons why Your Old Droog is still a treasure of musical performance.

Listen To YOD Wave Here!!! – BandCamp/Spotify/iTunes

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